Monthly Archives: June 2013

Al-Bashir Denies Vaccinations To 150,000 Children in Sudan

sudan_child_news
Girls wait for medical aid in Bram village in the Nuba Mountains

By SSN Staff

Juba — June 25, 2013 … Republic of Sudan headed by President Omar al-Bashir, who was indicted by the International Criminal Court for genocide and crimes against humanity, has again rejected a proposition made by the rebel Sudan People’s Liberation Movement North (SPLM-N). The plea was for a humanitarian cessation of hostilities to carry out a vaccination campaign.

SPLM-N Secretary General Yasir Arman, who leads its negotiating team, demanded again on Sunday to hold talks with the Sudanese government on how to organise a Polio vaccination campaign targeting 150,000 children under five years old in rebel held areas in South Kordofan and Blue Nile.

According to the report by the Sudan Tribune, Arman proposed a temporary humanitarian cessation of hostilities and to bring the vaccine and the material needed to carry out this operation directly from regional countries, Ethiopia and Kenya. The rebel group also requests that SPLM – humanitarian personnel should be involved instead of Sudanese staff.

He said that the families in the rebel controlled areas do not trust a vaccine brought from Khartoum which attempts to murder their children through the continued bombing.

Khartoum’s government spokesperson said they are resolved to not repeat the Operation Lifeline Sudan (OLS) in the rebel areas.

The operation was established in April 1989, months before Bashir coup d’état, as a result of an agreement signed by the government, UN aid agencies and SPLM rebels to reach civilians regardless of their location or political affiliation in South Sudan.

Sudan said the aid agencies instead of reaching civilians in the devastated famine areas delivered food to the SPLA fighters.

On May 27, Bashir accused South Sudan of helping the rebels in the southern parts of Sudan and explicitly threatened to stop the flow of oil from South Sudan to Red Sea ports. “We warn the government in the South that if they provide any assistance to the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) or to the rebels in Darfur, we will completely close the pipeline,” Bashir declared. “We will know if they stop the assistance, and we will know if they assist them.”

Experts of The Fashoda Institute (South Sudan’s Institute of Strategic and Regional Studies) believe that Khartoum’s new policy aims to markedly escalate tension, and even lead to wider war. The Islamist Government which came to power in Khartoum through a coup two decades ago made Sudan a hub of Jihadist terrorism serving as a link between the Sunni Al-Qaida and the Shiite Iran. Its decade-long genocidal war against Sudanese Christians and animalists resulted in the Darfur genocide and ICC indictment against Sudan’s President al-Bashir for crimes against humanity.

South Sudan’s independence gained in 2011 was perceived by the Islamist Government of Khartoum as a set-back in Jihad which has to be avenged.

Indeed, addressing the Khartoum rally on June 8, Bashir emphasized that stopping the flow of oil was only the beginning and that a military confrontation with South Sudan was soon to follow.

Waving his trademark baton and dancing on stage, Bashir addressed the now agitated and jubilant youth in the crowd and those watching the televised speech. Bashir urged the youths to join the Army and the paramilitary Popular Defense Forces.

Baroness Cox, Former Deputy Speaker of the British House of the Lords thinks that “it is only the resistance by Southern Sudan that is preventing the Islamization of the rest of Africa, down to Cape Town”.

American experts on African politics also believe that the real reason for Bashir’s sudden bellicosity has little to do with South Sudan’s alleged support for the rebellion in the southern parts of Sudan. The real reason is opposition’s credible threat to topple Bashir and his regime within 100 days because of the rapidly deteriorating socio-economic situation in the country. Earlier on June 8, Sudan’s opposition alliance, which is comprised of over 20 opposition parties, announced a plan for the peaceful overthrow of the Bashir regime. “I expect the regime will fall before the 100 days finish,” said alliance head Farouk Abu Issa.

The alliance’s plans include public forums and mass rallies aimed to mobilize the country’s destitute youth for peaceful protests until they are able to topple the Bashir government. The opposition alliance already prepared “an initiative for democratic change” that includes modalities for a transitional administration, and is “going to send this initiative to the president.” The opposition alliance intends to ask the state security services for permission to hold their first mass rally at Khartoum University. “If we don’t get it, then there is another step we can take but we will not announce it now,” Abu Issa told a press conference.

Bashir’s Khartoum cannot afford to ignore the opposition’s threats to agitate and mobilize the youth. Sudan is suffering from months of inflation exceeding 40%. Meanwhile, the overall unemployment rate is rapidly growing to well over 25%, with youth unemployment in the cities exceeding 60%. To date, there has been no outlet for the frustration and despair of Sudan’s urban youth. Nor was there any hope for a way out of their destitute. Now, Bashir fears, the opposition alliance might be offering these youth a venue for venting their frustrations and a hope for employment and betterment of life in the aftermath of a peaceful regime change.

Bashir’s Khartoum has no plan for economic change or recovery. Hence, Bashir desperately needs a foreign distraction for the masses, as well as excuse to dispatch the poor and discontent youth far away from Khartoum. The most expedient solution is for Bashir to send them to fight and die for the Jihad against South Sudan.

 

South Sudan Accuses Khartoum of Arming Terrorists

john_kong_south_sudan_newsSouth Sudan Defense Minister John Kong Nyuon

 

By SSN Staff

Juba — June 24, 2013 … South Sudan has evidence proving that neighboring Sudan was providing support to rebel groups fighting the Juba government.

Khartoum, according to South Sudan’s Defense Minister John Kong Nyuon, is using mercenaries to destabilize the new country, which separated from Sudan in July 2011.

According to the Sudan Tribune, Mr. Nyuon made these remarks at a meeting with Norwegian defence minister Anne-Grete Strøm-Erichsen, during which he accused Sudan of failing to implement the bilateral Cooperation Agreement signed in September last year.

Nyuon said that Khartoum is looking for a way to blackmailing the international community from pressing for the implementation of the agreement.

“Khartoum’s claims that we provide support to the rebels fighting them are not true”, Nyuon said.

“It is actually the government of Sudan which provides all kind of supports to militia groups they want to destabilize this country. These are not just allegations. We are holding evidence”, he added.

Three well armed militia groups, the defense minister revealed, have crossed from Sudan into South Sudan’s Unity and Upper Nile states with heavy weapons.

He said the groups that accepted the amnesty offered by president Salva Kiir, “admitted they were trained and armed by the government of Sudan”.

“Some are here with us. You ask them”, Nyuon told Norwegian defense minister during a meeting at the army headquarters in Juba on Sunday.

“Our interest is to see our neighbors including the Republic of Sudan live in peace. We want to live as good neighbors so that our people benefit from the mutual cooperation and promote build two viable states living side by side in peace and harmony”, he stressed.

Minister Nyuon further added that his country had fully implemented the cooperation agreement and the implementation matrix as it was agreed by the two parties and that they were expecting Sudan to do the same.

“It is the other side, which is not showing commitment and honor their promises. On our side, we have fully implemented and everybody knows this. It was done in a transparent manner. The international and local media were accorded the opportunity to go to the areas where we withdrew”, he said, adding that South Sudan had completely withdrawn its forces from the buffer zone as per the agreement.

 

South Sudan President Salva Kiir Starts War On Corruption, Fires 2 Ministers

AntiCorruptionBox

By SSN Staff

Juba — June 20 … The President of South Sudan has suspended two of his ministers and ordered an investigation into corruption allegations against them.

In a Presidential decree read Tuesday night, President Salva Kiir said he was lifting immunity for South Sudan Finance Minister Kosti Manibe Ngai and his Cabinet Affairs colleague Deng Alor Kuol.

It is stated that $8 million was transferred for the alleged purchase of anti-fire safes, but those goods were never delivered.

Corruption was a concern of South Sudan’s interim government since the 2005 peace deal that ended more than 20 years of civil war with Sudan. South Sudan seceded and became the youngest independent nation after a July 2011 referendum. President Kiir has pledged to put an end to corruption and dedicate all country’s resources to meeting the needs of impoverished population devastated by the decades of war with the Islamist giovernment of Khartoum which culminated in the Darfur genocide. Sudan’s President al-Bashir is indicted by the International Criminal Court and is wanted for crimes against humanity, genocide and war crimes.

Prospects of economic recovery in South Sudan are in jeopardy because of the renewed agression from Khartoum and threats of President al-Bashir to close the pipe-line which brings South Sudan’s oil, the main economic asset of the newborn land-locked country, to the markets.

On the morning of June 10, Sudanese forces – both military and irregulars of the Popular Defense Forces – attacked South Sudan’s Upper Nile State in several places along their border. In several spots, the Sudanese troops advanced some 10kms (6miles) into the territory of South Sudan – destroying rural infrastructure and scaring away the civilian population.

The Sudanese attack is an integral part of Khartoum’s policy of brinkmanship and aggression that is aimed to break down Juba’s will to exist as an independent state. The attack comes in the aftermath of a series of unilateral threats from Sudan’s upper-most leaders – starting with President Bashir’s sudden and unprovoked declaration, on Saturday, June 8, that Sudan was stopping the export of South Sudanese oil via Sudan’s pipeline. Bashir also urged all Sudanese youth to join the Popular Defense Forces and head south to fight South Sudan.

Experts of The Fashoda Institute (South Sudan’s Institute of Strategic and Regional Studies) believe that Khartoum is indeed cognizant of the ramification and consequences of Bashir’s sudden move. Bashir’s public declaration came irrespective of all the promises of a new era of cooperation by the highest levels of official Khartoum, and, more important, the explicit guarantees to Juba by Obama’s Washington that Khartoum will abide by all the agreements on keeping peace, oil export and revenues sharing.

In principle, opine East Africa experts in the West, Khartoum is exploiting Juba’s desire to export oil in order to increase pressure on Juba and demonstrate that Khartoum remains the senior player in the region. The desire of South Sudan to use oil revenues as an engine to jump start the nation’s economic recovery makes it vulnerable to Sudanese extortion. Moreover, Bashir’s orders to attack South Sudanese territory and cut-the-oil declaration comes in the aftermath of repeated warnings and threats regarding Juba’s alleged support for the escalating insurrection and popular revolt in southern Sudan.

On May 27, Bashir accused South Sudan of helping the rebels in the southern parts of Sudan and explicitly threatened to stop the flow of oil from South Sudan to Red Sea ports. “We warn the government in the South that if they provide any assistance to the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) or to the rebels in Darfur, we will completely close the pipeline,” Bashir declared. “We will know if they stop the assistance, and we will know if they assist them.”

The Fashoda Institute writes in its “Khartoum’s Oil War” analysis that Bashir’s June 8 declaration, which led to an armed confrontation 2 days later, is part of a major undertaking against South Sudan that goes far beyond retaliation for the alleged support for rebels in South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. Khartoum’s new policy aims to markedly escalate tension, and even lead to wider war. The Islamist Government which came to power in Khartoum through a coup two decades ago made Sudan a hub of Jihadist terrorism serving as a link between the Sunni Al-Qaida and the Shiite Iran. Its decade-long genocidal war against Sudanese Christians and animalists resulted in the Darfur genocide and ICC indictment against Sudan’s President al-Bashir for crimes against humanity.

South Sudan’s independence gained in 2011 was perceived by the Islamist Government of Khartoum as a set-back in Jihad which has to be avenged.

Indeed, addressing the Khartoum rally on June 8, Bashir emphasized that stopping the flow of oil was only the beginning and that a military confrontation with South Sudan was soon to follow.

Waving his trademark baton and dancing on stage, Bashir addressed the now agitated and jubilant youth in the crowd and those watching the televised speech. Bashir urged the youths to join the Army and the paramilitary Popular Defense Forces.

Baroness Cox, Former Deputy Speaker of the British House of the Lords thinks that “it is only the resistance by Southern Sudan that is preventing the Islamization of the rest of Africa, down to Cape Town”.

American experts on African politics also believe that the real reason for Bashir’s sudden bellicosity has little to do with South Sudan’s alleged support for the rebellion in the southern parts of Sudan. The real reason is opposition’s credible threat to topple Bashir and his regime within 100 days because of the rapidly deteriorating socio-economic situation in the country. Earlier on June 8, Sudan’s opposition alliance, which is comprised of over 20 opposition parties, announced a plan for the peaceful overthrow of the Bashir regime. “I expect the regime will fall before the 100 days finish,” said alliance head Farouk Abu Issa.

The alliance’s plans include public forums and mass rallies aimed to mobilize the country’s destitute youth for peaceful protests until they are able to topple the Bashir government. The opposition alliance already prepared “an initiative for democratic change” that includes modalities for a transitional administration, and is “going to send this initiative to the president.” The opposition alliance intends to ask the state security services for permission to hold their first mass rally at Khartoum University. “If we don’t get it, then there is another step we can take but we will not announce it now,” Abu Issa told a press conference.

Bashir’s Khartoum cannot afford to ignore the opposition’s threats to agitate and mobilize the youth. Sudan is suffering from months of inflation exceeding 40%. Meanwhile, the overall unemployment rate is rapidly growing to well over 25%, with youth unemployment in the cities exceeding 60%. To date, there has been no outlet for the frustration and despair of Sudan’s urban youth. Nor was there any hope for a way out of their destitute. Now, Bashir fears, the opposition alliance might be offering these youth a venue for venting their frustrations and a hope for employment and betterment of life in the aftermath of a peaceful regime change.

Bashir’s Khartoum has no plan for economic change or recovery. Hence, Bashir desperately needs a foreign distraction for the masses, as well as excuse to dispatch the poor and discontent youth far away from Khartoum. The most expedient solution is for Bashir to send them to fight and die for the Jihad against South Sudan.

 

 

Al-Bashir Wants to Cut Oil to South Sudan While His Poor Scour Garbage to Eat

By SSN Staffstarving_child_sudan

Juba — June 17 (SSN) … The Middle-east-online has interviewed the University of Khartoum economist Mohammed Eljack Ahmed who says that a growing number of people in Sudan are turning to the city’s rubbish for income in a “static economy” which is failing to create new jobs.

Sudanese have struggled to cope with soaring inflation and a weakened currency since South Sudan separated in July 2011 with about 75 percent of united Sudan’s oil production.

The lost crude accounted for most of Khartoum’s export earnings and half of its fiscal revenues.

Inflation is close to 40 percent, and Ahmed estimates that unemployment exceeds 30 percent.

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) estimated that Sudan’s economy would get a boost of nearly $500 million (375 million euros) this year and about $1.5 billion in 2014 under an agreement between the two countries for South Sudanese oil fees and a package to compensate for the loss of the South’s oil at separation.

This could help ease the deterioration in living standards for ordinary Sudanese.

“If this windfall is used wisely… it will contain the rising cost of living which has been crippling everyone but especially the poorest,” an IMF official said in May, as quoted by the Middle-east-online.

But new economic uncertainty emerged this month when Sudan began to stop the flow of oil.

President Omar al-Bashir ordered the closure of the pipelines carrying South Sudanese crude because of alleged southern support for rebels in the north.

After South Sudan’s separation, the oil refineries and export pipelines stayed under Khartoum’s jurisdiction. The South halted crude production early last year during a dispute over fees for its use of the infrastructure.

Southern production resumed in April and the oil had been slowly making its way toward the Red Sea export terminal before Bashir’s surprise order to close the line within 60 days.

If implemented, the oil compensation package would last for less than four years but the revenues would “provide a very valuable breathing space” for an economy which must be restructured, including through the revitalisation of neglected sectors like agriculture, the IMF official said.

Unless the damaged farm and industrial sectors can assume a significant economic role generating employment, the long-awaited oil revenue, despite its fiscal importance, will not be enough to help scavengers, says the university economist, Ahmed.

The Fashoda Institute, a new South Sudanese think-tank, has written in its recent analysis that the real reason for President al-Bashir’s sudden bellicosity and the armed escalation has little to do with South Sudan’s alleged support for the rebellion in the southern parts of Sudan. The real reason is opposition’s credible threat to topple al-Bashir and his regime within 100 days because of the rapidly deteriorating socio-economic situation in the country.

Earlier on June 8, Sudan’s opposition alliance, which is comprised of over 20 opposition parties, announced a plan for the peaceful overthrow of the al-Bashir regime. “I expect the regime will fall before the 100 days finish,” said alliance head Farouk Abu Issa. The alliance’s plans include public forums and mass rallies aimed to mobilize the country’s destitute youth for peaceful protests until they are able to topple the al-Bashir government. The opposition alliance already prepared “an initiative for democratic change” that includes modalities for a transitional administration, and is “going to send this initiative to the president.” The opposition alliance intends to ask the state security services for permission to hold their first mass rally at KhartoumUniversity. “If we don’t get it, then there is another step we can take but we will not announce it now,” Abu Issa told a press conference. 

Al-Bashir’s Khartoum cannot afford to ignore the opposition’s threats to agitate and mobilize the youth. Sudan is suffering from months of inflation exceeding 40%. Meanwhile, the overall unemployment rate is rapidly growing to well over 20-25%, with youth unemployment in the cities exceeding 50-60%. To-date, there has been no outlet for the frustration and despair of Sudan’s urban youth. Nor was there any hope for a way out of their destitute. Now, al-Bashir fears, the opposition alliance might be offering these youth a venue for venting their frustrations and a hope for employment and betterment of life in the aftermath of a peaceful regime change 

Al-Bashir’s Khartoum has no plan for economic change or recovery. Hence, al-Bashir desperately needs a foreign distraction for the masses, as well as excuse to dispatch the poor and discontent youth far away from Khartoum. The most expedient solution is for al-Bashir to send them to fight and die for the Jihad against South Sudan.

 

Turabi Urges Jihadists to “Reunite” with South Sudan

By South Sudan News Staff

Juba — June 13 … (SSN) Hassan al-Turabi – the spiritual guide of Sudan’s Islamists-Jihadists and the doyen of the global Jihadist trend since the early 1990′s – is in Doha, Qatar, to consult with Sheikh Youssuf al-Qaradawi – the spiritual guide of the Muslim Brothers and the entire Sunni Islamist trend.

hassan_al-turabi7

The main subject of the consultations between Turabi and Qaradawi is how to return Sudan to its former role and glory as a leader of global Islamism-Jihadism. Both veteran luminaries of radical Sunni Islam are convinced that the aggregate impact of the Islamist surge throughout the Middle East under the guise of “Arab Spring” and the growing public discontent in Khartoum create unique and conducive circumstances for replacing the regime of Omar Hassan al-Bashir with an Islamist-Jihadist regime.

While in Doha, Turabi gave an extensive interview to Muhammad al-Makki Ahmad of the London-based Al-Hayat newspaper – one of the two most important Arabic newspapers that is owned by the Sudairi branch of the Saudi Royal Family. Hence the prominence given to the interview by Al-Hayat reflects the endorsement by the likes of Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince. 

Hassan al-Turabi emphasized that the situation in Sudan has reached a boiling point that is aggravated by the regime’s deviation from Islamist ways. “The situation in Sudan has worsened to an inordinate degree, and the country is undergoing great turmoil.” Therefore, the Sudanese Popular Congress Party Turabi leads “are most keen on effecting change and toppling the regime because it historically represents Islam. And we cannot allow such a corrupt and oppressive regime to represent Islam.” Given the turmoil in Khartoum, Turabi expects “the regime to fall under the weight of a popular revolutionary movement.”

Turabi elaborated that Sudan “is undergoing great turmoil, and people inside the regime have grown despondent, no longer knowing if they belonged to the Islamist Movement or the ruling National Congress.”

Under these circumstances, the Bashir government finds itself under the same conditions “as other Sudanese governments that fell under the weight of popular revolutionary movements” in the 1964 and the 1985 revolutions. “The Sudanese people as a whole have grown tired of being oppressed, and one incident, even if not political, can ignite the situation on the ground. We only fear that chaos would ensue, and therefore strive to control things,” Turabi insisted.

To avoid chaos in the streets and fratricidal violence of the kind that had engulfed Egypt and other Arab countries, the Islamist opposition “proposed a transitional constitution that brings together all political forces, in order to make all sides happy.”

After a transitional phase, “constitutional elections would be held and the people would decide which constitutional amendments should be made, and elect those that best represent them.”

Turabi insisted that an Islamist-dominated interim regime was imperative to the establishment of a genuinely popular and legitimate post-Bashir government. He explained that “the opposition will not accept that a national government be formed within the framework of the Bashir regime, for any national government must be formed after the regime is overthrown. No one will participate in elections organized by the regime, and time must be given prior to elections being held.” Nor are Turabi and the Islamist camp ready to legitimize a palace coup in Khartoum.

“If a coup were to occur from inside the Presidential Palace, then all the opposition would stand against it and fight it until elections are held in a manner that ensures freedoms. We do not care much about who would assume power, whether from inside or outside the Palace.”

Absent a peaceful surrendering of power by Bashir, Turabi’s “preferred option is for the combined armed forces that is, the military, intelligence services, and the paramilitary Popular Defense Forces to rise and assume power, without subsequently ruling us militarily, while allowing the people to form a transitional government composed of independent or partisan figures.”

Turabi reiterated in no uncertain terms that there can be no compromise over the toppling of the Bashir regime and the establishment of an Islamist government in its stead. Khartoum must return to being the bastion and beacon of Islamism-Jihadism.

“My position towards toppling the Bashir regime is unwavering because the Sudanese regime has historically been associated with Islam, and we cannot allow that Islam be represented by an extremely corrupt regime that is ripping the country apart and will tear apart whatever remains of it. It is an oppressive regime that imprisons its people and has caused them grave economic crises.”

Having facilitated Bashir’s original seizing of power back in 1989 so that Khartoum become a center for spreading Islamism-Jihadism under Turabi’s leadership – Turabi is now adamant on toppling Bashir for having betrayed the “sacred” cause, and on empowering a new Islamist leader that will enable Turabi resume his spreading of Islamism-Jihadism.

Turabi stressed that once the Islamist interim government comes to power in Khartoum – the first urgent item on the agenda would be resolving “the enduring tragedy of the South” – that is, South Sudan. Turabi is very explicit about his vision of how to approach the South challenge.

The Islamists, he stressed, “strive for the South to peacefully and willingly reunite with the North and return to Sudan’s bosom.” The growing and spreading crises in the South have been creating conducive conditions for the reunification of Sudan, Turabi argued. The recent contacts between Khartoum and Juba confirmed this trend beyond a shadow of doubt.

Alas, this dynamics was recently disrupted by Bashir’s sudden decision to halt the flow of oil from the South through pipelines in the North. The South’s renewed trepidation of unity with the North was caused “by Bashir, who reneged after signing an agreement with them (in Addis Ababa), and told them [the Southerners] to go drink their petroleum. They – the Southerners -don’t want to be governed by a promise that others reneged on.” 

Turabi intends to restore confidence with the South and offer them an olive branch and a call for peaceful reunification. Should the Southerners refuse his generous offer, Turabi is adamant of leading a campaign to “restore the unity of the Muslim Ummah in general.” 

 

 

Amnesty Slams Sudan For “Scorched Earth” Tactics, War Crimes

By South Sudan News Staff

Juba — June 12 (SSN) … The Sudanese armed forces have burned and shot civilians to death in a “scorched earth” campaign against a rebel chief’s home district in Blue Nile state, Amnesty International reports.

Satellite imagery confirms that the attacks in Blue Nile’s Ingessana Hills, the birthplace of rebel Chairman Malik Agar, occurred in the first half of last year, the London-based watchdog said in a 74-page report released on Tuesday.

The Australian reports

The Sudan’s army called the charges a fabrication. The attacks were part of what appeared to be “a concerted attempt” to clear civilians from areas held by Agar’s Sudan People’s Liberation
Movement-North, and to punish residents perceived to be supporting
the rebels, the human rights group said.

The Ingessana area, southwest of the state capital Ed Damazin, was particularly hard-hit, Amnesty said, after visiting rebel-held areas and interviewing refugees.

About 150,000 people have fled to South Sudan or Ethiopia since fighting began in September 2011.

“The Sudan army used scorched-earth tactics, destroying at least eight villages in the (Ingessana) area and probably many more,” Amnesty said.

“Sudanese forces would bomb and shell villages before invading and burning them down” after using indiscriminate firepower, it said.

“Civilians fled when the attacks began, but some of those who were unable to flee because of disability or age were burned alive in their homes or shot by soldiers.”

Amnesty’s Sudan researcher, Jean-Baptiste Gallopin, said in a statement that deliberately attacking civilians is a war crime.

“This systematic and deliberate targeting of civilians follows a disturbing pattern that was used by the Sudanese government to devastating effect in Darfur,” said Gallopin.

The Sudanese government continues to block humanitarian relief to civilians in rebel-held areas.

“By taking the unconscionable decision to bar humanitarian aid, the Sudanese government is once again causing civilian deaths and suffering on a massive scale,” said Gallopin.

“The international community has failed to enforce the International Criminal Court’s indictment of President Omar al-Bashir who is wanted on charges of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes committed in Darfur. The ongoing violations in Blue Nile demonstrate yet again that it is civilians who pay the price when impunity for war crimes goes unchecked.”

Khartoum Attacks Juba, Blames South Sudan For Continued Grassroots Resistance

By South Sudan News Staff

On the morning of June 10, Sudanese forces – both military and irregulars of the Popular Defense Forces – attacked South Sudan’s Upper Nile State in several places along their border. In several spots, the Sudanese troops advanced some 10kms (6miles) into the territory of South Sudan – destroying rural infrastructure and scaring away the civilian population.

The Sudanese attack is an integral part of Khartoum’s policy of brinkmanship and aggression that is aimed to break down Juba’s will to exist as an independent state. The attack comes in the aftermath of a series of unilateral threats from Sudan’s upper-most leaders – starting with President Bashir’s sudden and unprovoked declaration, on Saturday, June 8, that Sudan was stopping the export of South Sudanese oil via Sudan’s pipeline. Bashir also urged all Sudanese youth to join the Popular Defense Forces and head south to fight South Sudan.

The next day, Sunday, June 9, Sudan’s Intelligence Chief Muhammad Atta al-Moula warned that since South Sudan had failed to stop supporting rebels operating in Darfur and the border states of South Kordofan and Blue Nile – Sudan would have to retaliate sternly. Significantly, Atta accused these rebels of “fighting to topple the Khartoum government” even though they are actually fighting for self-determination and self-survival. “They (the rebels) get supplied with weapons, ammunition, petrol, spare parts for cars, food - they send their wounded to hospitals in the South. Tens of wounded (rebels) are now being treated in the South,” Atta said. Thus, by Khartoum’s definition, in ostensibly supporting the rebels – Juba is actually supporting the overthrow of the Bashir regime in Khartoum. Therefore, Atta declared, not only will Sudan block the flow of oil from South Sudan (which might take up to 60 days to implement) – but Sudan will also suspend the nine agreements, including security and economic pacts, reached in March 2013 with South Sudan after mediating by the African Union (AU). 

In response, on Monday morning, June 10, official Juba attempted to cool down the rhetoric from Khartoum. South Sudanese Army Spokesman Col. Philip Aguer stated that Juba would not consider Khartoum’s threat to shut down the oil exports “a return to armed hostility” as long as Khartoum continued to respect the recent security agreements. “The oil can be shut down,” Aguer said. “What may amount to a declaration of war is if the security agreements that have been reached [by the AU] are violated. Oil is just a bilateral agreement which the Sudanese government has the choice to accept or not to accept.” Juba also reiterated that Khartoum’s allegations regarding support for the rebels were false. “We are not helping any rebels,” Aguer said. “The allegations are baseless. It’s just because they [the Sudanese forces] have been unable to defeat the rebels that they are looking for an explanation elsewhere.”

Alas, as Aguer was offering the olive branch – Sudanese forces were already attacking the territory of South Sudan and invading its Upper Nile State. Raids and inconclusive fighting will continue for a few days. Ultimately, the Sudanese force will be compelled to withdraw back to the poorly demarcated border. The people of Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile States will continue their valiant struggle against oppression and indiscriminate violence by Sudan.

Khartoum will blame Juba for the continued grassroots resistance, and continue the cross-border violence. Absent the realization of the legitimate quest for security and self-determination by the people of South Kordofan and Blue NileStates – violence will continue and keep escalating while official Sudan will seek excuses by blaming and attacking South Sudan’s border states.

AL-BASHIR ATTACKS SOUTH SUDAN, STIRS JIHADISTS TO DISTRACT FROM DOMESTIC PROTESTS

By South Sudan News Staff

JUBA — 10 June (SSN) … Sudan has invaded the territory of South Sudan on the morning of June 10th. Two days ago Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir had announced the halt of the export of South Sudanese oil via Sudan’s pipeline and called on the Sudanese youth to join the Army and the paramilitary Popular Defense Forces in order to go and liberate the southern parts of Sudan from the rebels. 

Experts of The Fashoda Institute (South Sudan’s Institute of Strategic and Regional Studies) believe that Khartoum is indeed cognizant of the ramification and consequences of Bashir’s sudden move. Bashir’s public declaration came irrespective of all the promises of a new era of cooperation by the highest levels of official Khartoum, and, more important, the explicit guarantees to Juba by Obama’s Washington that Khartoum will abide by all the agreements on keeping peace, oil export and revenues sharing.

In principle, opine East Africa experts in the West, Khartoum is exploiting Juba’s desire to export oil in order to increase pressure on Juba and demonstrate that Khartoum remains the senior player in the region. The desire of South Sudan to use oil revenues as an engine to jump start the nation’s economic recovery makes it vulnerable to Sudanese extortion. Moreover, Bashir’s orders to attack South Sudanese territory and cut-the-oil declaration comes in the aftermath of repeated warnings and threats regarding Juba’s alleged support for the escalating insurrection and popular revolt in southern Sudan.

On May 27, Bashir accused South Sudan of helping the rebels in the southern parts of Sudan and explicitly threatened to stop the flow of oil from South Sudan to Red Sea ports. “We warn the government in the South that if they provide any assistance to the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) or to the rebels in Darfur, we will completely close the pipeline,” Bashir declared. “We will know if they stop the assistance, and we will know if they assist them.”

The Fashoda Institute writes in its “Khartoum’s Oil War” analysis that Bashir’s June 8 declaration, which led to an armed confrontation 2 days later, is part of a major undertaking against South Sudan that goes far beyond retaliation for the alleged support for rebels in South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. Khartoum’s new policy aims to markedly escalate tension, and even lead to wider war. The Islamist Government which came to power in Khartoum through a coup two decades ago made Sudan a hub of Jihadist terrorism serving as a link between the Sunni Al-Qaida and the Shiite Iran. Its decade-long genocidal war against Sudanese Christians and animalists resulted in the Darfur genocide and ICC indictment against Sudan’s President al-Bashir for crimes against humanity.

South Sudan’s independence gained in 2011 was perceived by the Islamist Government of Khartoum as a set-back in Jihad which has to be avenged.

Indeed, addressing the Khartoum rally on June 8, Bashir emphasized that stopping the flow of oil was only the beginning and that a military confrontation with South Sudan was soon to follow.

Waving his trademark baton and dancing on stage, Bashir addressed the now agitated and jubilant youth in the crowd and those watching the televised speech. Bashir urged the youths to join the Army and the paramilitary Popular Defense Forces.

Baroness Cox, Former Deputy Speaker of the British House of the Lords thinks that “it is only the resistance by Southern Sudan that is preventing the Islamization of the rest of Africa, down to Cape Town”.

American experts on African politics also believe that the real reason for Bashir’s sudden bellicosity has little to do with South Sudan’s alleged support for the rebellion in the southern parts of Sudan. The real reason is opposition’s credible threat to topple Bashir and his regime within 100 days because of the rapidly deteriorating socio-economic situation in the country. Earlier on June 8, Sudan’s opposition alliance, which is comprised of over 20 opposition parties, announced a plan for the peaceful overthrow of the Bashir regime. “I expect the regime will fall before the 100 days finish,” said alliance head Farouk Abu Issa.

The alliance’s plans include public forums and mass rallies aimed to mobilize the country’s destitute youth for peaceful protests until they are able to topple the Bashir government. The opposition alliance already prepared “an initiative for democratic change” that includes modalities for a transitional administration, and is “going to send this initiative to the president.” The opposition alliance intends to ask the state security services for permission to hold their first mass rally at Khartoum University. “If we don’t get it, then there is another step we can take but we will not announce it now,” Abu Issa told a press conference.

Bashir’s Khartoum cannot afford to ignore the opposition’s threats to agitate and mobilize the youth. Sudan is suffering from months of inflation exceeding 40%. Meanwhile, the overall unemployment rate is rapidly growing to well over 25%, with youth unemployment in the cities exceeding 60%. To date, there has been no outlet for the frustration and despair of Sudan’s urban youth. Nor was there any hope for a way out of their destitute. Now, Bashir fears, the opposition alliance might be offering these youth a venue for venting their frustrations and a hope for employment and betterment of life in the aftermath of a peaceful regime change.

Bashir’s Khartoum has no plan for economic change or recovery. Hence, Bashir desperately needs a foreign distraction for the masses, as well as excuse to dispatch the poor and discontent youth far away from Khartoum. The most expedient solution is for Bashir to send them to fight and die for the Jihad against South Sudan.

Khartoum’s Oil War On South Sudan: From Threats To Action

Juba — June 9 …. On June 8, Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir suddenly announced the halt of the export of South Sudanese oil via Sudan’s pipeline.

There was a lot of populist theatrics and incitement in the way Bashir announced his decision to close the oil pipeline in a public rally in Khartoum.

On stage, Bashir turned around to Oil Minister Awad al-Jaz, who was standing behind him, and gave him instructions on state matters. “Tomorrow you … will order the oil companies to close the pipeline,” Bashir told al-Jaz with the microphones open and the TV cameras rolling.

Bashir then turned to the cheering public and explained that his decision was in response to South Sudan’s continued funding of rebels in the southern parts of Sudan. Bashir explained that the “decision follows careful study of all its consequences and repercussions.” The crowd started cheering. “Sudan will not allow revenues from oil exports from South Sudan to be used to buy arms for rebels and mercenaries,” Bashir declared. It was a public politics undertaking designed to maximize political rewards for Bashir.

Khartoum is indeed cognizant of the ramification and consequences of Bashir’s sudden move. Bashir’s public declaration came irrespective of all the promises of a new era of cooperation by the highest levels of official Khartoum, and, more important, the explicit guarantees to Juba by Obama’s Washington that Khartoum will abide by all the agreements on oil export and revenues sharing.

In principle, Khartoum is exploiting Juba’s desire to export oil in order to increase pressure on Juba and demonstrate that Khartoum remains the senior player in the region. The desire of South Sudan to use oil revenues as an engine to jump start the nation’s economic recovery makes it vulnerable to Sudanese extortion.

Moreover, Bashir’s declaration comes in the aftermath of repeated warnings and threats regarding Juba’s alleged support for the escalating insurrection and popular revolt in southern Sudan. On May 27, Bashir accused South Sudan of helping the rebels in the southern parts of Sudan and explicitly threatened to stop the flow of oil from South Sudan to Red Sea ports. “We warn the government in the South that if they provide any assistance to the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) or to the rebels in Darfur, we will completely close the pipeline,” Bashir declared. “We will know if they stop the assistance, and we will know if they assist them.”

However, Bashir’s June 8 declaration is part of a major undertaking against South Sudan that goes far beyond retaliation for the alleged support for rebels in South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. Khartoum’s new policy aims to markedly escalate tension, and even lead to wider war, along the Sudan-South Sudan border. Indeed, addressing the Khartoum rally on June 8, Bashir emphasized that stopping the flow of oil was only the beginning and that a military confrontation with South Sudan was soon to follow.

Waving his trademark baton and dancing on stage, Bashir addressed the now agitated and jubilant youth in the crowd and those watching the televised speech. Bashir urged the youths to join the Army and the paramilitary Popular Defense Forces in order to go and liberate the southern parts of Sudan from all rebels. “I want you all to go there (Southern Sudan),” he reiterated to the cheering crowd. Abdallah al-Jabili, the Chief of Sudan’s notorious Popular Defense Forces, was also on-stage. After Bashir made his call for action, al-Jabili stepped forward and announced that the Popular Defense Forces were ready to “confront any attempt by South Sudan to shake up the country’s stability.” He also appealed to the agitated youth to join the Forces and bolster their ranks.

The real reason for Bashir’s sudden bellicosity and threats has little to do with South Sudan’s alleged support for the rebellion in the southern parts of Sudan.

The real reason is the opposition’s credible threat to topple Bashir and his regime within 100 days because of the rapidly deteriorating socio-economic situation in the country. Earlier on June 8, Sudan’s opposition alliance, which is comprised of over 20 opposition parties, announced a plan for the peaceful overthrow of the Bashir regime. “I expect the regime will fall before the 100 days finish,” said alliance head Farouk Abu Issa. The alliance’s plans include public forums and mass rallies aimed to mobilize the country’s destitute youth for peaceful protests until they are able to topple the Bashir government. The opposition alliance already prepared “an initiative for democratic change” that includes modalities for a transitional administration, and is “going to send this initiative to the president.”

The opposition alliance intends to ask the state security services for permission to hold their first mass rally at Khartoum University. “If we don’t get it, then there is another step we can take but we will not announce it now,” Abu Issa told a press conference.

Bashir’s Khartoum cannot afford to ignore the opposition’s threats to agitate and mobilize the youth. Sudan is suffering from months of inflation exceeding 40%. Meanwhile, the overall unemployment rate is rapidly growing to well over 20-25%, with youth unemployment in the cities exceeding 50-60%. To-date, there has been no outlet for the frustration and despair of Sudan’s urban youth. Nor was there any hope for a way out of their destitute. Now, Bashir fears, the opposition alliance might be offering these youth a venue for venting their frustrations and a hope for employment and betterment of life in the aftermath of a peaceful regime change.

Bashir’s Khartoum has no plan for economic change or recovery. Hence, Bashir desperately needs a foreign distraction for the masses, as well as excuse to dispatch the poor and discontent youth far away from Khartoum. The most expedient solution is for Bashir to send them to fight and die for the Jihad against South Sudan.

SOUTH SUDAN IN EGYPT’S CROSS-HAIRS

June 9, 2013 – - -
May 28, 2013, was a turning point in the brewing Nile water crisis when Ethiopia activated the diversion of the course of the Blue Nile in order to make way for the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (that will be very close to the Sudanese border). When completed in five years, the dam will be the largest hydroelectric power plant in Africa – producing about 6,000 MW. The reservoir will hold 63 billion cubic meters of water – making it one of Africa’s largest. The Blue Nile will return to its natural course after the completion of the dam’s construction in 2018.
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