Tag Archives: uganda

Uganda Supports President Museveni on Anti-Gay Legislation

By Joe Odaby
South Sudan News

February 24, 2014 — The Observer has published a controversial article defending the sovereign right of the Ugandan Parliament to pass legislation curbing gay propaganda and of Ugandan President Museveni to ratify it. It calls on Museveni to resist Obama’s pressure and asserts that the “homosexualism has reached an extent that we, Ugandans, perceive as alien to our culture and ethos as a people”.

Charlotte Ntulumme who teaches Journalism and Communication at Makerere University argues that the “homosexual movement is taking the world by carefully crafted strategy to mobilise nations to support the gay agenda. According to American conservative organisations, it was set in the late 1980s, in a book, After the Ball: How America Will Conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the ‘90s, published in 1989 by Marshall Kirk and Hunter Madsen. The authors laid out a six-point plan to transform the beliefs of ordinary Americans with regard to homosexual behaviour over a decade. The points include portraying gays as victims, not as aggressive challengers, making the anti-gay movement look bad and getting funds for the gay propaganda from corporate America. The book calls on gay rights groups to adopt professional public relations techniques to convey their message. Apparently, the strategy is working. That is why opposition to any attempt to subject homosexuality to the law is packaged as “an affront and a danger to the gay community”, oppression of a minority and violation of human rights, freedom and justice”.

The author exposes as a fraud “use of scientific research to prove that one can be born homosexual” and points that  “no matter how rational one’s reasoning may be, dissent on this subject is homophobia”.

As American author Alex McFarland states in an essay, ‘Debunking 5 Common Arguments for Homosexuality’ (adapted from his new book, 10 Issues that Divide Christians), “It matters not on what grounds one’s disagreement with homosexuality is based: A person may disagree with the homosexual agenda for moral, religious, philosophical, sociological, academic, or medical reasons; it doesn’t matter. According to most currently holding seats of cultural leadership, any and all disagreement is rooted in homophobia.”

“This is why President Museveni should be lauded for his bold stance in announcing that he will sign the Anti-Homosexuality Bill into law”, proclaims Mrs. Ntulumme. “The bill has raised a furore – not unexpectedly – from various quarters of the world. The Obama government has warned that enacting the “odious” legislation would “complicate [America’s] valued relationship with Uganda”.

The Washington Post, in its February 11 editorial called for a strong response to anti-gay legislation in Nigeria [and Uganda] from the West. The paper suggested that the US and Britain, “should be aggressively using their leverage to protect the vulnerable gay community…”

A more shocking reaction came from the leadership of the Anglican Church, urging leaders in Africa and, particularly, the presidents of Nigeria and Uganda, to criticise new laws criminalising homosexuality. They said “victimisation or diminishment of human beings… is anathema” to the Church of England.

“This is all hogwash”, says Charlotte Ntulumme. “Uganda’s motto is “For God and My Country” and in our national anthem, we petition God to uphold our nation. Every religious denomination in Uganda has failed to find a single scripture in their holy books that condones homosexuality. All agree that the act is abominable, detestable, repugnant and offends God in whose hands “we lay our future”. The bishops of Canterbury and York should, therefore, tell us how we are supposed to reconcile these two opposite positions”.

“As the gay PR machine gets busy, Uganda and her President must snub the lies and withstand the sweeping tide of the gay domino effect”, concludes Charlotte Ntulumme.

South Sudan: George Clooney’s Sentinel Project Exposes Machar’s Atrocities

By Joe Odaby
South Sudan News

Juba — January 22 … In Adis-Ababa, Ethiopia, negotiations between the South Sudanese Government led by President Kiir and  representatives of the rebel forces of Riek Machar continue without a breakthrough. Machar’s camp refused to negotiate the only issue of importance to the South Sudanese delegation – a cease-fire that will stop the suffering of, and casualties among, innocent civilians.

Influential think-tank The Fashoda Institute has commented that civilians are kept “hostage” to Machar’s “power hungry demands from Juba”.

Meanwhile the use of child soldiers by Riek Machar in his so called “White Army” has caused international condemnation and a stern letter from UK legislators. Satellite imagery collected by George Clooney’s Sentinel Project clearly show the massive destruction in Bor inflicted when Machar’s forces were present in Bor and that the buildings and shacks were destroyed by people and vehicles on the ground rather than government’s artillery fire (no craters and signs of fire). UN photographs taken on the ground confirm the senseless destruction by Machar’s rampaging forces.

Meanwhile, regional governments were increasingly petrified by the possibility that tribes and other sectors in their own states be inspired or assisted by Machar’s coup attempt. Most directly threatened and thus ready to act is Uganda. Ugandan involvement was a result of Kampala’s apprehension about the dire impact that certain developments in South Sudan might have on the national security and stability inside Uganda. Kampala acknowledged that Ugandan “army has marched into South Sudan” in order to “protect Uganda’s own security and economic interests.”

Other IGAD leaders keep urging the rebels in South Sudan to put down arms and engage in a dialogue with President Kiir. “Machar’s coup attempt – futile and doomed as it might have been – reminded all African leaders of the looming threats to the African political system”, notes the Fashoda Institute. “

Perhaps, a blessing in disguise of the Machar coup attempt will be a reminder to all African leaders and government of the urgent imperative to focus on tribe-blind state building and development reforms for the future”.

 

East Africa Committed To South Sudan, President Kiir’s Success

 

By Philip Johnston

Juba — July 11, 2013 … One of the main accomplishments of the two years of South Sudan’s independence is broadening regional cooperation in East Africa and unwavering support neighboring countries give to this youngest independent democracy.

That support was highlighted during the second independence anniversary celebrated in Juba, South Sudan on July 9th.

South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir has received pledges of cooperation and committment from Uganda, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, Botswana, South Africa, UN, EU, USA and the African Union.

Despite the effects of the oil shutdown, used by the Jihadist regime of Khartoum to strangle South Sudan, the regional East African leaders underscored the tremendous progress South Sudan has made in its bid to develop the country devastated by the two decades long civil war.

“When I was coming, flying over Juba, I looked down through the window of the plane, seeing the expansion of the city, I thought we were lost. Juba has grown in such a very short time”, said President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni of Uganda. He wondered how much more would have been achieved had precious time not been lost in the many years of civil war.

“We must learn from each other and share experiences of each our recent past and work together to form a future that will be beneficial to all of us,” said said Rwanda’s President Paul Kagame.

Calling for regional integration, President Kagame said South Sudan is bound to contribute to peace, security and development in the region and Africa as a whole. He said there is need to strengthen intra-African infrastructure and create economic growth in the region.

Reaffirming the commitment of his government to work with South Sudan and the region, the Rwandan President called for unity in the region to avoid what he said is “divide in action”.

Botswana’s President Lt. General Seretse Khama Ian Khama, former South African President Thabo Mbek and UN Special Representative of the Secretary General Hilde Johnson, were many among regional and international dignitaries that graced the second independence anniversary attended by hundreds of thousands of South Sudanese at the Dr. John Garang Mausoleum in Juba.

US Secretary of State John Kerry stated: “On behalf of President Obama and the people of the United States, we extend our best wishes to the people of the Republic of South Sudan on the second anniversary of your independence.”
 

Kerry added: “The vision that South Sudan laid out for itself two years ago requires a sustained commitment to democracy and good governance, justice and accountability, and respect for the rule of law and the human rights of all of South Sudan’s people. We support South Sudan’s efforts to institute governmental reform at all levels, resolve outstanding conflicts, promote economic growth, and ensure peace and stability. The United States remains committed to helping South Sudan build a more prosperous, inclusive, and democratic society – one that is at peace internally and with its neighbors. On the second anniversary of your nation’s independence, the journey continues and we stand ready to help support economic prosperity, democratic governance, and respect for human rights in South Sudan for years to come.”